Balance Between Radiation Risks and Obtaining a Complete Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study in Pediatric Patients Comprehensive evaluation of swallowing in infants and children frequently requires the use of instrumental procedures following a thorough clinical evaluation to answer specific questions through objective information (Arvedson & Lefton-Greif, 1998; ASHA, 1990, 1992, 2000, 2001; Benson & Lefton-Greif, 1994; Langmore & Logemann, 1991; Logemann, 1993). For example, children ... Article
Article  |   October 2004
Balance Between Radiation Risks and Obtaining a Complete Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study in Pediatric Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan C. Arvedson
    Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
  • Copyright © 2004 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   October 2004
Balance Between Radiation Risks and Obtaining a Complete Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study in Pediatric Patients
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2004, Vol. 13, 18-23. doi:10.1044/sasd13.3.18
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia), October 2004, Vol. 13, 18-23. doi:10.1044/sasd13.3.18
Comprehensive evaluation of swallowing in infants and children frequently requires the use of instrumental procedures following a thorough clinical evaluation to answer specific questions through objective information (Arvedson & Lefton-Greif, 1998; ASHA, 1990, 1992, 2000, 2001; Benson & Lefton-Greif, 1994; Langmore & Logemann, 1991; Logemann, 1993). For example, children with neurologic impairment are particularly likely to have no observable clinical indications (e.g., coughing or choking) when they aspirate while eating and drinking. Thus, speech-language pathologists and other professionals need additional objective information to assist in determination of safety and efficiency for oral feeding and of the relative contribution that various structures or physiologic processes contribute to feeding and swallowing difficulties (e.g., Arvedson, Rogers, Buck, Smart, & Msall, 1994; Barbiera et al., 2004; Fung, Khong, To, Goh, & Wong, 2004; Taniguchi & Moyer, 1994). It is critical to define risks for aspiration and delineate whether those risks appear closely related to the process of swallowing liquid, food, or secretions and/or whether the child may be at greater risk due to gastroesophageal reflux, especially extraesophageal reflux with direct aspiration of acidic contents. For the purposes of this article, the focus is on videofluoroscopy, particularly the issues surrounding radiation safety and the comprehensive objective examination of swallowing.
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